Growth not benchmarks the key to school success

Growth not benchmarks the key to school success

Sunday, 7 Aug 2005

The mark of a school's success is how effectively it causes growth for students and not just how many students it helps over a particular 'proficiency hurdle,' according to a visiting US education expert. Professor Gage Kingsbury of the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) is in Melbourne to deliver the opening keynote address to the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) tenth annual conference, entitled Using Data to Support Learning.

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Using student performance data effectively

Using student performance data effectively

Friday, 5 Aug 2005

The education community could benefit from learning to use data about student performance more effectively to support both student and teacher learning, according to educational researcher Dr Ken Rowe. Successful learning support depends on the extent to which schools are provided with an opportunity to claim 'ownership' and 'control' over their own data. Dr Rowe is the Research Director of ACER's Learning Processes research program, and will speak on Tuesday 9 August at the ACER Research Conference 2005, Using Data to Support Learning.

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700 delegates to attend ACER Research Conference

700 delegates to attend ACER Research Conference

Thursday, 4 Aug 2005

More than 700 researchers, policy makers and teachers from around Australia and overseas will meet in Melbourne next week to consider issues confronting Australian schools in the collection and use of data at ACER's tenth annual Research Conference, entitled Using Data to Support Learning. Research Conference 2005 is the largest conference undertaken by ACER. Three keynote addresses and 16 concurrent sessions will be delivered over the two day program.

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Tertiary students report high levels of satisfaction

Tertiary students report high levels of satisfaction

Thursday, 28 Jul 2005

Tertiary study is a largely positive experience for the vast majority of first year students, a new report released by ACER today shows. Among the report's key findings is that a large majority of students reported that they liked being a student (94 per cent), tertiary student life suited them (87 per cent), they enjoyed the atmosphere on campus (88 per cent) and they had made close friends at their tertiary institution (89 per cent). A significant majority (82 per cent) felt that the experience had lived up to their expectations.

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Student interests drive course change and attrition

Student interests drive course change and attrition

Thursday, 30 Jun 2005

University students who change courses or withdraw from study without gaining a qualification are more likely to be driven by personal interests and career objectives than academic difficulties or financial pressures, according to new research. A new report, Course change and attrition from higher education, released today examined the pathways of almost 7000 young Australians who were in Year 9 in 1995 and commenced higher education in 1999 or 2000.

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