Senior secondary school students’ perceptions of the world of work

Senior secondary school students’ perceptions of the world of work

Monday, 5 Sep 2005

A new report into the perceptions of work held by senior secondary school students provides a valuable insight into the current skills shortage and youth unemployment rate by uncovering a significant mismatch between student career aspirations and the reality of the labour market. The survey of 3,018 year 10, 11 and 12 students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds has found that a majority of students are identifying preferred career paths based on their skills and personal interests with little to no understanding of the availability of these jobs in the current labour market. Most (80%) expect to get the job they would most like at age 25 and few have considered the possibility of compromise should employment in their chosen field be hard to come by. The study, What do students know about work? funded by the AMP Foundation and conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) for The Smith Family also found that a quarter of students were planning insufficient education for their preferred job.

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New study shows intentions and attitudes predict participation in schooling

New study shows intentions and attitudes predict participation in schooling

Friday, 2 Sep 2005

Nurturing positive attitudes to school could be the key to increasing participation in post-compulsory education according to new research. The latest findings from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY), released today, show that intentions to complete or leave school formed early in secondary schooling are powerful predictors of participation in the latter years of school. Attitudes to school were in turn found to strongly influence these educational intentions prompting researchers to conclude that by promoting a positive attitude toward school, educators can increase participation in education beyond compulsory schooling.

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Teacher intuition still important as schools swamped with data

Teacher intuition still important as schools swamped with data

Tuesday, 9 Aug 2005

Using data in school decision-making does not have to be a mechanical or technical process that denigrates educators' intuition, teaching philosophy and personal experience, according to Dr Lorna Earl, Associate Professor and co-director of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Dr Earl is speaking in at the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) annual conference entitled Using Data to Support Learning.

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What is the nature of evidence that makes a difference to learning

What is the nature of evidence that makes a difference to learning

Monday, 8 Aug 2005

The move to collecting more data from schools needs to be stopped and the move to making defensible interpretations about teaching and learning upgraded to priority level a leading educationalist will tell a Melbourne conference. Professor John Hattie of Auckland University is delivering a keynote address to the tenth annual Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) conference entitled Using Data to Support Learning.

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Growth not benchmarks the key to school success

Growth not benchmarks the key to school success

Sunday, 7 Aug 2005

The mark of a school's success is how effectively it causes growth for students and not just how many students it helps over a particular 'proficiency hurdle,' according to a visiting US education expert. Professor Gage Kingsbury of the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) is in Melbourne to deliver the opening keynote address to the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) tenth annual conference, entitled Using Data to Support Learning.

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