A balanced approach needed for students with learning difficulties

A balanced approach needed for students with learning difficulties

Wednesday, 19 Oct 2005

A new review of research into the teaching of literacy and numeracy skills to students with learning difficulties asserts that there is no one single instructional method that deserves sole claim to being 'best practice.' Instead, the common wisdom of research points to the need for balanced approaches to accommodate the diverse needs of students.

The latest Australian Education Review, Balancing approaches: Revisiting the educational psychology research on teaching students with learning difficulties, released today, examines what contemporary research, largely meta-analyses from the field of educational psychology, says about the often controversial and much debated field of how best to teach basic literacy and numeracy skills to students with learning difficulties. It identifies current limitations in Australian research and calls for some changes in teacher training.

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Not all Year 12 courses are equal

Not all Year 12 courses are equal

Thursday, 29 Sep 2005

Inappropriate course selection in Year 12 can leave some students unable to participate in further education and in a vulnerable position in the labour force a new report has found. A study of the patterns of course choice in Year 12 and the consequences of these choices, released today by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), shows that subject choice has a major influence on the educational and career options open to them after finishing school.

Although most Year 12 students make a successful transition to tertiary study or work, some parts of the Year 12 curriculum act as better pathways to post secondary education and training than others, reinforcing the importance of access to quality career guidance in school.

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Senior secondary school students’ perceptions of the world of work

Senior secondary school students’ perceptions of the world of work

Monday, 5 Sep 2005

A new report into the perceptions of work held by senior secondary school students provides a valuable insight into the current skills shortage and youth unemployment rate by uncovering a significant mismatch between student career aspirations and the reality of the labour market. The survey of 3,018 year 10, 11 and 12 students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds has found that a majority of students are identifying preferred career paths based on their skills and personal interests with little to no understanding of the availability of these jobs in the current labour market. Most (80%) expect to get the job they would most like at age 25 and few have considered the possibility of compromise should employment in their chosen field be hard to come by. The study, What do students know about work? funded by the AMP Foundation and conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) for The Smith Family also found that a quarter of students were planning insufficient education for their preferred job.

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New study shows intentions and attitudes predict participation in schooling

New study shows intentions and attitudes predict participation in schooling

Friday, 2 Sep 2005

Nurturing positive attitudes to school could be the key to increasing participation in post-compulsory education according to new research. The latest findings from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY), released today, show that intentions to complete or leave school formed early in secondary schooling are powerful predictors of participation in the latter years of school. Attitudes to school were in turn found to strongly influence these educational intentions prompting researchers to conclude that by promoting a positive attitude toward school, educators can increase participation in education beyond compulsory schooling.

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Teacher intuition still important as schools swamped with data

Teacher intuition still important as schools swamped with data

Tuesday, 9 Aug 2005

Using data in school decision-making does not have to be a mechanical or technical process that denigrates educators' intuition, teaching philosophy and personal experience, according to Dr Lorna Earl, Associate Professor and co-director of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Dr Earl is speaking in at the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) annual conference entitled Using Data to Support Learning.

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